NEWS

SatCen’s SSA activities: More than 10 years providing security in space

Many activities, including communication, navigation and Earth observation, rely on satellites and other space-based assets. But these assets are at risk, as space is becoming increasingly complex and congested. In this context, SatCen is working for more than 10 years in Space Situational Awareness (SSA), focusing on protecting the safety and security of European economies, societies and citizens.

 

The revamped SSA page on SatCen’s website provides information on the Centre’s activities as part of the EU Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) Support Framework, where it plays a key role as the EU SST Front Desk. SST activities protect space-based assets from the risk of collision against other satellites or space debris, detect and characterise fragmentations in space, and predict the re-entry of space objects that may cause damage on the ground.

 

SatCen develops and operates the SST Portal - the interface for delivering SST services, which are generated by the Member States of the SST Consortium - and supports SST users through a helpdesk. Currently, some 100 organisations benefit from these services and more than 200 European satellites are safeguarded from the risk of collision. SatCen is also responsible for KPIs activities - which monitor all EU SST functions (sensor, processing, services) -, leads communication, dissemination and user engagement activities, and coordinates the EU SST Taskforce for critical events, as detailed in the SSA webpage.

 

SatCen’s SSA activities are crucial for the Centre to perform its mission, but also in the context of the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and space sustainability, making SatCen ready for the future EU Space Programme as a unique provider of security of space and in space.

 

More information on SatCen’s SSA activities: https://www.satcen.europa.eu/page/ssa

EU SST website: https://www.eusst.eu

SST Portal: https://portal.eusst.eu

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    Image1 of 2Representation of the amount of man-made objects larger than 1cm currently orbiting the Earth, estimated at 1 million
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    Image2 of 2EUSST Front Desk